Oceans Without Limits – A Journey of Discovery

Embark on a voyage of discovery into the Western Indian Ocean and find out how plastic pollution is impacting this tropical paradise. “Oceans Without Limits” is an epic and cinematic Oceanic Adventure with an element of Science.
 
A crew, made up of a Skipper, Pro Diver, Marine Biologist and Filmmaker, go way off the beaten track to document their findings. They travel from South Africa to Madagascar, Seychelles, Maldives and a distant Archipelago called Chagos. Their discoveries are both unexpected and shocking!
 
Thank you for supporting our mission to end plastic pollution. By purchasing or renting our film, you are enabling us to move towards our next project which is to go back and develop a method of cleaning up remote islands that are polluted by plastic!

OUR STORY

We have all been touched by the Ocean in some form or another, with a few of us having been fortunate enough to call the Ocean ‘our office’. We are now in a position to give something back and use our journey across the Indian Ocean to highlight the plight of Plastic Pollution.

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OUR MISSION

An adventure of a life time on the Indian Ocean brought three men together to explore ways to end the plastic horror engulfing our marine life. By using the latest in video and camera technology we will provided continuous insight into our travels, capturing life at sea, all action on board the motor yacht ACHARNE.

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OUR BOAT

The concept of taking a well-respected ex-racing yacht and converting it to a serious ocean passage making motoryacht is not new. By reducing the yacht’s displacement by removing the sailing rig, modifying the keel, and installing a larger engine you create an extraordinary explorer yacht.

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OUR DOCUMENTARIES

The journey covered some of the most spectacularly beautiful and isolated places in the worlds. After the completion of the trip a feature-length documentary was created to share what we had captured, this is Oceans Without Limits.

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OUR RESEARCH

Seagrass is a true flowering plant that grows in clumps and can form extensive underwater beds. The physical structure of seagrass beds provides a combination of food and habitat which allows for high biomass and productivity of commercially important fish species. The seagrass beds in the Indian Ocean region also act as a nursery for species that inhabit adjacent habitats such as coral reefs and mangroves.

Seagrass is a bio-engineer of soft sediment habitats and maintains shoreline stability by preventing erosion of the sediment with its roots and rhizomes which disrupts currents and promotes the settling of suspended sediments and restricts their resuspension. Seagrass may also have a similar effect on suspended microplastic particles and thus increase the amount of microplastic in the sediment in areas inhabited by seagrass beds causing adverse effects within the ecosystem and its fauna.

The aim of our study was to test whether seagrass beds cause an increase in the quantity of microplastic in the sediment in the Indian Ocean where many people are reliant on the sea for both protein and income.

Due to the relevant literature, a higher quantity of microplastic was expected in areas where seagrass is present compared to areas where it is absent

Our aim is to educate, create awareness and SHARE OUR research!

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Today's the day all you ocean-lovers and plastic-fighters 🌊🖤
Grab the popcorn and a cold one, or the nearest bottle of Captain Morgan’s .. all you need for the perfect sea-faring Movie Night.

Seeing as this is our first global release, we have decided to make 2 versions of the film available to our loyal and awesome followers and supporters!

* Our full feature of 90 minutes gives more info on our preparation for the journey, as well as more behind the scenes adventure elements of the journey out at sea – it gets a little rough at times! Also certain interviews along the way cut from the 55min version can be seen in this film, adding more people detail to our story.

* The 55 minute cutdown version was created for those who are more interested in focusing on the plastic impact elements that we discovered on our journey – and for those busy folk who don’t have 90 minutes to spare. This is also the version that will be made available for distribution to TV broadcasters due to their time slot requirements.

TO PURCHASE OR RENT:  The 55minute version will be available for purchase and rental on our website after this Premiere is over, and will remain so for the rest of Plastic Free July. Our next mission is to go back out there to develop and deploy a sustainable method of cleaning plastic from these remote islands, so if you would like to support us - which we would love you to do - you will be playing an important part in creating the solution! After all, #plasticfreejuly is the springboard for great changes in the months to come.

To access the film at 7pm this evening go to our Facebook Event: the link to our website will be there. The rest is straight forward. Kick back your sea legs and enjoy! 

#plasticfree #oceanswithoutlimits #oceanlove #journeyofdiscovery #learningjourneys #plasticoceans #protectouroceans #plasticpollution #bethesolution #cleanseas #everybodynow #oceanfilmfestival #oceandocumentary #filmpremiere #oceanstories #oceanview #marinelife #planetorplastic #plasticplanet #noplanetb #noexcuseforsingleuse #refusereducereuserecycle #indianocean #seychelles #maldives #madagascar
Today's the day all you ocean-lovers and plastic-fighters 🌊🖤 Grab the popcorn and a cold one, or the nearest bottle of Captain Morgan’s .. all you need for the perfect sea-faring Movie Night. Seeing as this is our first global release, we have decided to make 2 versions of the film available to our loyal and awesome followers and supporters! * Our full feature of 90 minutes gives more info on our preparation for the journey, as well as more behind the scenes adventure elements of the journey out at sea – it gets a little rough at times! Also certain interviews along the way cut from the 55min version can be seen in this film, adding more people detail to our story. * The 55 minute cutdown version was created for those who are more interested in focusing on the plastic impact elements that we discovered on our journey – and for those busy folk who don’t have 90 minutes to spare. This is also the version that will be made available for distribution to TV broadcasters due to their time slot requirements. TO PURCHASE OR RENT: The 55minute version will be available for purchase and rental on our website after this Premiere is over, and will remain so for the rest of Plastic Free July. Our next mission is to go back out there to develop and deploy a sustainable method of cleaning plastic from these remote islands, so if you would like to support us - which we would love you to do - you will be playing an important part in creating the solution! After all, #plasticfreejuly is the springboard for great changes in the months to come. To access the film at 7pm this evening go to our Facebook Event: the link to our website will be there. The rest is straight forward. Kick back your sea legs and enjoy! #plasticfree #oceanswithoutlimits #oceanlove #journeyofdiscovery #learningjourneys #plasticoceans #protectouroceans #plasticpollution #bethesolution #cleanseas #everybodynow #oceanfilmfestival #oceandocumentary #filmpremiere #oceanstories #oceanview #marinelife #planetorplastic #plasticplanet #noplanetb #noexcuseforsingleuse #refusereducereuserecycle #indianocean #seychelles #maldives #madagascar
By now, our journey had already dealt us incredible sights and stark contrasts from Madagascar to the Seychelles. Our next destination was the Maldives, a distant island nation in the Western Indian Ocean full of its own startling stories. 

Malé is the pint-sized capital of the Maldives, yet it is also one of the most densely populated cities in the world, with a population of more than 215,000 crammed into an area of 8.3km square. It really doesn’t compare to the laid-back life elsewhere in the country, and it was hard for us to overlook both tightly-packed humans and what it is that they bring to environments under pressure.

These small coral islands are surely among the most beautiful locations on the planet; their reef systems have developed over thousands of years into some of the most complex and diverse in the world. These tiny ocean outliers have withstood monsoons, tsunamis, storm surges and sea swells. But looming larger now is a vast wave of plastic. 

In a nation with few municipal waste facilities and huge pressure on the limited available land, the sea has traditionally been a dumping ground. Even the word for “beach” in Dhivehi, the local language, roughly translates as rubbish dump. A couple of generations ago this would not have mattered. Beach litter would have been biodegradable, and would soon have returned to the ecosystem. Today, as we clearly saw, it is plastic bottles and packaging that end up in the sea. 

But there’s hope on their lovely but littered horizon: the Maldives has the most ambitious plastics phase-out plans of any nation on earth.. so we should be watching their space and hoping they can show others that it’s possible, and soon.

#plasticfreejuly #plasticfree #plasticoceans #maldives #maldives🇲🇻 #cleanbeaches #beachcleanup #marinelife #oceanpledge #riseuptogether #recycle #refusereducereuserecycle #protectouroceans #oceanlove #oceanswithoutlimits #plasticsucks #do1thing #plasticfootprint #oceanvoyager
By now, our journey had already dealt us incredible sights and stark contrasts from Madagascar to the Seychelles. Our next destination was the Maldives, a distant island nation in the Western Indian Ocean full of its own startling stories. Malé is the pint-sized capital of the Maldives, yet it is also one of the most densely populated cities in the world, with a population of more than 215,000 crammed into an area of 8.3km square. It really doesn’t compare to the laid-back life elsewhere in the country, and it was hard for us to overlook both tightly-packed humans and what it is that they bring to environments under pressure. These small coral islands are surely among the most beautiful locations on the planet; their reef systems have developed over thousands of years into some of the most complex and diverse in the world. These tiny ocean outliers have withstood monsoons, tsunamis, storm surges and sea swells. But looming larger now is a vast wave of plastic. In a nation with few municipal waste facilities and huge pressure on the limited available land, the sea has traditionally been a dumping ground. Even the word for “beach” in Dhivehi, the local language, roughly translates as rubbish dump. A couple of generations ago this would not have mattered. Beach litter would have been biodegradable, and would soon have returned to the ecosystem. Today, as we clearly saw, it is plastic bottles and packaging that end up in the sea. But there’s hope on their lovely but littered horizon: the Maldives has the most ambitious plastics phase-out plans of any nation on earth.. so we should be watching their space and hoping they can show others that it’s possible, and soon. #plasticfreejuly #plasticfree #plasticoceans #maldives #maldives🇲🇻 #cleanbeaches #beachcleanup #marinelife #oceanpledge #riseuptogether #recycle #refusereducereuserecycle #protectouroceans #oceanlove #oceanswithoutlimits #plasticsucks #do1thing #plasticfootprint #oceanvoyager
🌊 It’s that #ThrowbackThursday time again! 
As we stepped onto the island beaches of the Seychelles, we were inspired to meet the team behind The Ocean Project Seychelles. These guys were way ahead of the game since their 2016 start-up, playing a major part in the Government banning plastic bags through a variety of great initiatives.

Their approach and die-hard enthusiasm blew us away from the beach cleaning get-go - and this hands-on approach is just one of the ways in which the OPS is making a huge difference to the understanding and fate of marine debris. 

The monthly educational, coastal clean-ups of beaches and waterways across the islands are amazingly inclusive, involving everyone from community groups and school kids to businesses and other NGOs. Gloves-on, everyone fishing for a haul of predominantly single-use plastics.. plastic bottles, cups, straws, and bags, the usual suspects.

Education, action and research - including informative films and artwork - are the lynch-pins of what they do, tirelessly, in the face of the Western Indian Ocean trash epidemic. Having witnessed on our journey up to that point just a fraction of what the islanders are exposed to everyday, their energy was refreshing in the face of our plastic overwhelm. 

We're honoured to have them feature as a key throwback moment to our voyage and film. Groups like this around the world will be doing what they do to tackle single-use plastic use and pollution throughout this key month but, equally and resolutely, the other 11 months too. So huge gratitude and respect to them for this day-in, month-out and year-on-year determination.
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#plasticfreejuly #cleanbeaches #cleanbeachesstartathome #beachcleanup #seychelles #plasticfree #plasticpollution #plasticoceans #cleanseas #pristineseas #beachplastic #noexcuseforsingleuse #refusereducereuserecycle #protectouroceans #zerowaste #wavesforchange #plasticsucks
🌊 It’s that #ThrowbackThursday time again! As we stepped onto the island beaches of the Seychelles, we were inspired to meet the team behind The Ocean Project Seychelles. These guys were way ahead of the game since their 2016 start-up, playing a major part in the Government banning plastic bags through a variety of great initiatives. Their approach and die-hard enthusiasm blew us away from the beach cleaning get-go - and this hands-on approach is just one of the ways in which the OPS is making a huge difference to the understanding and fate of marine debris. The monthly educational, coastal clean-ups of beaches and waterways across the islands are amazingly inclusive, involving everyone from community groups and school kids to businesses and other NGOs. Gloves-on, everyone fishing for a haul of predominantly single-use plastics.. plastic bottles, cups, straws, and bags, the usual suspects. Education, action and research - including informative films and artwork - are the lynch-pins of what they do, tirelessly, in the face of the Western Indian Ocean trash epidemic. Having witnessed on our journey up to that point just a fraction of what the islanders are exposed to everyday, their energy was refreshing in the face of our plastic overwhelm. We're honoured to have them feature as a key throwback moment to our voyage and film. Groups like this around the world will be doing what they do to tackle single-use plastic use and pollution throughout this key month but, equally and resolutely, the other 11 months too. So huge gratitude and respect to them for this day-in, month-out and year-on-year determination. . . #plasticfreejuly #cleanbeaches #cleanbeachesstartathome #beachcleanup #seychelles #plasticfree #plasticpollution #plasticoceans #cleanseas #pristineseas #beachplastic #noexcuseforsingleuse #refusereducereuserecycle #protectouroceans #zerowaste #wavesforchange #plasticsucks
A big warm waste-free Welcome to Plastic Free July! We're so stoked to be in this really positive partnership with the original and inspirational Plastic Free July movement throughout this month and, with every good intention, far beyond.

Please scroll down for a bunch of fantastic plastic starting points and ideas on their platform. 
Ultimately, trash-bashing progress is a duty of care which rests on all of us.. so please jump on-board with our Oceans Without Limits team and the big initiative! 🙌🏼🌍

♻️♻️♻️♻️

• Posted @withregram • @plasticfreejuly •

🌍 Welcome to the 10th Plastic Free July! It’s a personal challenge that is part of a global challenge for the oceans, for cleaner streets and the planet. Choose one single-use plastic you can avoid and you’ll soon discover another…and another great solution.

Signing up to the Plastic Free July challenge is the easiest way to discover the plastic free solutions that suit you. We provide resources and ideas to help you (and millions of others around the world) reduce single-use plastic waste everyday at home, work, school, and even at your local café. It’s not about being perfect (there is no failing with Plastic Free July) but rather start with looking at the plastics in your life (look inside your bin, fridge or pantry) and start with choosing to refuse one single-use plastic.

Our movement has inspired over 250 million participants in 177 countries. You making a small change will collectively make a massive difference to our communities. You can choose to refuse single-use plastics in July (and beyond!). Best of all, being part of Plastic Free July will help you to find great alternatives that can become new habits forever.

It is easy to question what difference one person can make but last year our participants avoided 825 million kg of plastic waste – together WE CAN MAKE A DIFFERENCE!

Design by @catfishcreative 🐟
.

#plasticfreejuly #plasticfree #plasticoceans #plasticseas #pristineseas #planetorplastic #oneoceanoneplanet #noplanetb #oneplanetoneocean #plasticsucks #noexcuseforsingleuse #noplastic #refusereducereuserecycle #stoptrashingourplanet #plasticpollution #everybodynow #livedeeplytreadlightly
A big warm waste-free Welcome to Plastic Free July! We're so stoked to be in this really positive partnership with the original and inspirational Plastic Free July movement throughout this month and, with every good intention, far beyond. Please scroll down for a bunch of fantastic plastic starting points and ideas on their platform. Ultimately, trash-bashing progress is a duty of care which rests on all of us.. so please jump on-board with our Oceans Without Limits team and the big initiative! 🙌🏼🌍 ♻️♻️♻️♻️ • Posted @withregram • @plasticfreejuly • 🌍 Welcome to the 10th Plastic Free July! It’s a personal challenge that is part of a global challenge for the oceans, for cleaner streets and the planet. Choose one single-use plastic you can avoid and you’ll soon discover another…and another great solution. Signing up to the Plastic Free July challenge is the easiest way to discover the plastic free solutions that suit you. We provide resources and ideas to help you (and millions of others around the world) reduce single-use plastic waste everyday at home, work, school, and even at your local café. It’s not about being perfect (there is no failing with Plastic Free July) but rather start with looking at the plastics in your life (look inside your bin, fridge or pantry) and start with choosing to refuse one single-use plastic. Our movement has inspired over 250 million participants in 177 countries. You making a small change will collectively make a massive difference to our communities. You can choose to refuse single-use plastics in July (and beyond!). Best of all, being part of Plastic Free July will help you to find great alternatives that can become new habits forever. It is easy to question what difference one person can make but last year our participants avoided 825 million kg of plastic waste – together WE CAN MAKE A DIFFERENCE! Design by @catfishcreative 🐟 . #plasticfreejuly #plasticfree #plasticoceans #plasticseas #pristineseas #planetorplastic #oneoceanoneplanet #noplanetb #oneplanetoneocean #plasticsucks #noexcuseforsingleuse #noplastic #refusereducereuserecycle #stoptrashingourplanet #plasticpollution #everybodynow #livedeeplytreadlightly
Days like these... 🌊
Our Crossings were like shifting shades of blue and gold as we journeyed across the Western Indian Ocean. On the high seas our main impressions were of #pristineseas .

But we discovered that what lies beneath and on the beach is a very different story in this unique part of the world. Apart from the thousands of islands, visualize more than 10,000km of coastline stretching from Kenya to South Africa. It'd be fair to predict clean sandy beaches and coral rich marine waters all the way, given Africa’s relatively low plastic footprint; but not so. The Indian Ocean at large is the world's biggest dumping ground for plastic waste; but nobody seems to know exactly where it comes from or where it goes.

As technology to remotely track plastics doesn't yet exist, researchers have followed thousands of satellite tracked buoys left to drift in global ocean currents for 30 years now. Up to a point, their behaviour simulates the real pathways plastic waste takes. 

This invaluable intel flags Southeast Asia to be the main source of floating trash, with Somalia a big culprit too. But that's only half the story; from here, weird patterns of weather and currents hitting the Western Indian Ocean send plastics on a much more mysterious journey than elsewhere. Strong trade winds disperse plastics further to the west here than in the other oceans; there, unmissable garbage patches would concentrate at the surface where currents meet. Instead, weird westerly 'plastic highways' leak right across the width of these seas, past South Africa and into the South Atlantic Ocean. 

Along the way, as we witnessed, even the remotest islands get caught in the crossfire. These outliers are like canaries in a coal mine and it’s increasingly urgent that we act on the warnings they are giving us. Ocean #plasticpollution is everywhere, so we need all the tech and tactics to observe and tackle the waste - our waste - now circling the globe.

🎥 @mvwijk33 w/ @oceanswithoutlimits 

#oceanswithoutlimits #oceans #seachange #oceanswithoutborders #wavescape #wavescapesa #cleanseas #plasticoceans #westernindianocean #oceanmood #oceanlove #oceanplastic #plasticwaste #protectouroceans
Days like these... 🌊 Our Crossings were like shifting shades of blue and gold as we journeyed across the Western Indian Ocean. On the high seas our main impressions were of #pristineseas . But we discovered that what lies beneath and on the beach is a very different story in this unique part of the world. Apart from the thousands of islands, visualize more than 10,000km of coastline stretching from Kenya to South Africa. It'd be fair to predict clean sandy beaches and coral rich marine waters all the way, given Africa’s relatively low plastic footprint; but not so. The Indian Ocean at large is the world's biggest dumping ground for plastic waste; but nobody seems to know exactly where it comes from or where it goes. As technology to remotely track plastics doesn't yet exist, researchers have followed thousands of satellite tracked buoys left to drift in global ocean currents for 30 years now. Up to a point, their behaviour simulates the real pathways plastic waste takes. This invaluable intel flags Southeast Asia to be the main source of floating trash, with Somalia a big culprit too. But that's only half the story; from here, weird patterns of weather and currents hitting the Western Indian Ocean send plastics on a much more mysterious journey than elsewhere. Strong trade winds disperse plastics further to the west here than in the other oceans; there, unmissable garbage patches would concentrate at the surface where currents meet. Instead, weird westerly 'plastic highways' leak right across the width of these seas, past South Africa and into the South Atlantic Ocean. Along the way, as we witnessed, even the remotest islands get caught in the crossfire. These outliers are like canaries in a coal mine and it’s increasingly urgent that we act on the warnings they are giving us. Ocean #plasticpollution is everywhere, so we need all the tech and tactics to observe and tackle the waste - our waste - now circling the globe. 🎥 @mvwijk33 w/ @oceanswithoutlimits #oceanswithoutlimits #oceans #seachange #oceanswithoutborders #wavescape #wavescapesa #cleanseas #plasticoceans #westernindianocean #oceanmood #oceanlove #oceanplastic #plasticwaste #protectouroceans

OUR PARTNERS

TAKING ACTION

Making a Difference in Fighting Plastic Pollution